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Month: December 2017

EXPLORING CZECH NYMPHING METHODS ON THE ASSEGAI RIVER

JBSC1On one of the supposed last trips to the river with new friend Jarryd Bach we found us on one of my favorite stretches on the Assegai River. While crossing the river we noticed a lot of fish in the faster glides and rapids in water hardly deeper than knee high, these fish were actively feeding in this really shallow water and didn’t seem to bothered with our presence, but we passed them up, in favor of the better waters, that I believed would be more productive, after a short hike upstream we came to the pool that I had in mind for the afternoons fishing, within a short space of time I made one or two casts and gave a few pointers to Jarryd, quickly realizing that the fishing here in the pool would not be to good due to the water being off color, I suggested we move back down to where we had seen the fish earlier in the glide.

A quick change of leader and flies and we made our first casts, shortline nymphing to the yellows that were actively feeding in the fast current, it wasn’t too long before I was on with a small but decent sized Smallscale Yellowfish, it accounted well for itself with a short but spirited fight, I managed to slip the net under it, after popping the hook from its mouth I let it go back into the stream.

Now it was Jarryd’s turn, Pointing him to a spot on the water I moved upstream to spot for him, the fish were so close I could poke them with the rod tip if I stretched my arm far enough out. The first few drifts of the fly were pretty exciting as I grunted and made all kinds of noises every time I saw the indicator bob or slow down, instead of yelling strike or hit or some other profanity, but it didn’t take too long and soon he was on, it fought well enough for its size and used the current to its advantage, not to long and out came the net and in the fish went, even though it wasn’t a trophy sized Smallscale it was his first one and that to me is just as special, a quick pic, or two and back it went.

JBSCRelease1The rest of the afternoon went pretty much the same, grunts and curses included, as we missed the quick takes of the yellows picking up and rejecting the flies like lightning, but all in all, by the time it became too dark to see and we were packed up, he had managed to land at least four more fish I can recall including a Largescale to add to another first on fly for him. We headed home and later after a good meal, we parted ways.

Well that night I sat around thinking as to what would be the most effective way to target these fish, after looking into the various methods of fishing nymphs in a fast current, I decided on giving Czech Nymphing a go. It wasn’t too long before I found myself on the water again and the fish were still there in the same shallow section again, a quick leader change and of I went, note I have never Czech Nymphed before so this was all new to me, at first the lobbing of flies that were nearly heavy enough to knock you out if they did hit you felt strange, but it did not take too long and they quickly fell where I wanted them, now to learn how to control the drift and stay in contact with the flies at the same time, after some trial and error this to snapped into place and the sighter of the leader straightened and I lifted into the take, that first run with such a short line out was so direct it nearly caught me of guard, but I managed to stay on without breaking a rod or leg in the shallow water on slippery rocks as the fish at first powered upstream and then suddenly turned and flashed passed me as I frantically tried to keep tension on the barbless hook.  Stumbling like a frightened hippo I managed to keep everything tight and I managed to get the fish close enough to lift a healthy but not too large Smalscale out of the water with the net. After sliced bread I think barbless hooks are the next best thing and often after the first two or three flops in the net the hooks normally just pop out and it’s just a matter of sinking the net below water level and helping the fish out back into the current.

After disturbing this section with my previous antics I took a few paces upstream to where I could see a few more fish holding in the current and lobbed the flies up into the stream and tracking them downstream again, this time I let them sweep past me and sure thing there that sighter bobbed again, I set the hook and let the fish run, this one turned around and used the current against me, but since the water was slightly of color I had stepped up the fluorocarbon tippet section and was able to put some pressure on the fish and work it upstream again. The rest of the afternoon blurred into a one as I by trial and error on my own learned how to control the drift of the flies and stay in contact with them as I worked my way upstream, fishing likely spots. By the end of the day I returned with sore arms and a content smile.

All things considered at the end of the season Czech Nymphing seems to be quite effective for targeting Smallscale Yellows and even the odd Largescale that have moved into the shallow riffles and runs to feed in the slightly clearer water, the sunlight seems to penetrate easier into the lower water levels, in comparison to the deeper slower pools, this I believe increases visibility slightly making it easier for the yellows to pick up nymphs and other aquatic creatures drifting by.  The number of wish taken was quite surprising but no fish over a kilo and a half were caught.

The rains have come full force now as I sit typing this out and the river is flowing brown and strong, thus the Czech Nymph experiment will have to wait till next year. Still it extended the season a little longer and if that’s the case then even a small yellow is a good yellow, when normal methods don’t work